Schmidt-Synthesizer ships fourth batch of its namesake no-expense-spared Eightvoice Analog Synthesizer
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Schmidt C LogoLANGENAU, GERMANY: having since sold out of its previous built-to-order batches of between 25 and 27 instruments each, the first of which followed from an interest in namesake hardware and software designer Stefan Schmidt’s hand-crafted prototype unit’s show-stopping debut at Musikmesse 2011 in Frankfurt, Germany, Schmidt-Synthesizer is proud to announce that it has started shipping an eagerly-anticipated fourth batch of its no-expense-spared Schmidt Eightvoice Analog Synthesizer — available in classic anthracite- or cool white-colored configurations with visually improved hardware operation, courtesy of cosmetic color changes to several key knobs, and feature-enhancing firmware, currently at version 3.6 — as of December 16…

Schmidt Eight Voice Front

Starting shipment of the fourth (25-unit) batch of the still-sought-after Schmidt Eightvoice Analog Synthesizer has taken time with time spent waiting while production partner e:m:c (electronic music components) successfully solved procurement problems relating to hard-to-source components. “Now nothing stands in the way of further construction of these unique instruments,” says Schmidt-Synthesizer Product Manager Axel Fischer.

“From a hardware perspective, the new Schmidt Eightvoice Analog Synthesizer is identical to the previous batches, save for the fact that 11 knobs have been changed to a grey color, making for a more clearly arranged operational layout,” Axel Fischer finally notes — not before highlighting some welcomed additions: “It includes the current firmware, which adds an easy-to-use onboard polyphonic step sequencer capable of recording 40 steps with each step made up of up to six notes — designed to be used as a live performance tool, and an arpeggiator.”

Apart from that, the beautifully-built Schmidt Eightvoice Analog Synthesizer’s specifications as an eight-voice polyphonic, true analog dream machine with digital control and preset memories — 1,028 single sounds and 256 multi-sounds are available at any given time — are as they were before. But bearing in mind that it includes almost everything subtractive synthesis is capable of, including some truly unique features — for example, creating colder, wavetable-like sounds thanks to its chain of five ring modulators fed by six pulse-waves, each with different pulse-widths — that have never before been implemented in an analogue synthesizer let alone an analogue programmable polysynth, those impressive specifications are well worth revisiting, as highlighted here: discrete sound generation circuitry — no integrated oscillator/filter circuits on a single chip; dual and true multitimbral modes; separate audio outputs per voice, plus summing outputs and headphone output; 61 keys, semi-weighted with velocity and aftertouch; sophisticated glide/portamento capabilities; several realtime modifiers, fully programmable per preset; comprehensive MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) implementation with USB (Universal Serial Bus) port and DIN (Deutsches Institut für Normung) connectivity; adjustable-angle capacious control panel with dedicated knobs and buttons for all sound programming functions; precise information on parameter names and current values via a large LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) with changeable colour background; multi-colour LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes); internal power supply; and, last but not least — though there is clearly so much more besides, an included flight case.

As a case in point, the fourth batch of the no-expense-spared Schmidt Eightvoice Analog Synthesizer surely epitomizes the age-old adage: anything worth having is worth waiting for. Indeed, it has been well worth the wait. With e:m:c recently receiving a sizeable order from the only store it supplies, anyone interested in owning a premier league instrument that will be handcrafted in Germany to meet the highest possible production standards with a metal and wood — carefully selected with a close eye on environmental sustainability — casing that is as beautiful as it is sturdy should seriously consider placing an order directly with Schmidt-Synthesizer’s production partner. After all, the Schmidt Eightvoice Analog Synthesizer is truly a subtractive synthesis world unto itself!

Schmidt-Synthesizer and production partner e:m:c (electronic music components) have had to increase pricing for the fourth batch of the no-expense-spared Schmidt Eightvoice Analog Synthesizer by approximately 10%. Within the EU (European Union) it is €21,900.00 EUR (including VAT) for one in classic anthracite, while white weighs in at €22,900.00 EUR (including VAT), with shipping costs not included. Outside of the EU, it is €18,500.00 EUR (excluding VAT) for one in classic anthracite, while white weighs in at €19,300.00 EUR (excluding VAT), with customs and shipping costs not included. Interested parties should contact e:m:c here: info@emc-de.com

For more detailed information, please visit the dedicated Schmidt Eightvoice Analog Synthesizer website here: http://www.schmidt-synthesizer.com/en/index.html

Enjoy taking a Schmidt Eightvoice Analog Synthesizer ‘sneak peek’ in the suitably-impressive surroundings of the Giesshalle (casting hall) at Sayner Hütte, a German industrial heritage building in Bendorf, here:

 

About Schmidt-Synthesizer (www.schmidt-synthesizer.com)
Back in the techno music-driven Nineties, German company MAM’s MB-33 Analog Retro Bass Synthesizer — an authentic-sounding clone of Roland’s reverential TB-303 Bassline that was commanding crazy money on the second-hand market at the time — represented Stefan Schmidt’s first foray into serious (and successful) electronic musical instrument design. Its planned successor — a clone of the majestic Moog Taurus bass synthesizer, much loved by the likes of Canadian prog-rockers Rush — remains at a prototype stage only. Instead, its instigator took a radical detour, spending some serious time thinking about and developing what would become his namesake dream machine, the no-expense-spared Schmidt Eightvoice Analog Synthesizer — surely one of the most ambitious analog synthesizer projects ever undertaken. After a show-stopping showcase at The NAMM Show 2013, Stefan Schmidt’s hand-crafted first prototype unit was promptly purchased by a suitably captivated customer directly from the show floor… the rest, as they say, is history.

Here today, but not gone tomorrow, Schmidt-Synthesizer sees Stefan Schmidt continuing to turn his dream machine into reality with a dream team triumvirate: Achim Jerominek (production), Axel Fischer (product management), and e:m:c (electronic music components) President Stefan Hund (manufacturing).

© 2020 Schmidt-Synthesizer

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